RTW

You Got Questions? I Got Answers!

It’s quickly approaching the two year mark of my travels, and when I mention this to people, I get a lot of wide-eyed stares and wows. After the wows come the questions. So in this blog post I’m going to answer the most frequently asked questions I get, in a similar format as my very first blog post.

Where have you been?

My summary answer is: Four months road tripping in the USA, ten months in Central and South America, two months in the USA and now five months in Asia. For the specific countries and timeline, check my “stats” page.

How much longer are you going to travel?

I really don’t know yet. It really depends on money, if I get a job and if I get tired of traveling. I’m pretty sure I have at least another year in me.

Do you love it?

This is an easy one. Yes, I do love it. Full time travel is not perfect and there are days that I’m depressed or lonely or sick, but those days come and go so quickly.

Aren’t you tired of it?

No, I’m not yet tired of traveling. I do get tired, but usually it’s when I’m moving too quickly from place to place. If I start to get tired of traveling, I just stop somewhere for a week or two or four and unpack my bag and rest.

You’re so brave. Aren’t you ever scared?

I always laugh a little when I get this question. I don’t feel like a particularly brave person. I am just living my dream. It feels natural and easy for me to do exactly what I want to be doing. To me that’s not brave, it’s just common sense. If you always wanted to get married and have children, and then you do that, people don’t say “you’re brave”. They say, cool. I think the difference is that my goal of full time travel is not as common as the goal of a house with the white picket fence.  And I’m very rarely ever scared of anything.  Travel has helped me to conquer most of my fears.

I'm not scared!

I’m not scared!

Have you fallen in love?

Yes, I have fallen in love hundreds of times, with cities, with trees and flowers, with sunsets, with people, with cultures, and with myself. It sounds kooky, but this whole experience has opened my eyes to so much. The world is so much broader and interesting than my old life. I call my mom on FaceTime and tell her, “Oh mom, this country is beautiful. I love it here!” And she replies, “Laurie, you say that about all the places.” And she’s right! Every place I have been has been an amazing learning experience for me, and I love them all in a different way.

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I fell in love with this lake in Nepal.

No, I meant have you found a boyfriend/husband?

Yeah, I know what you meant. I was just avoiding the question. I have met so many interesting and kind people from all over the world. I would be lucky to call any number of them my boyfriend, but I’m just not in a place emotionally or geographically to settle down. I’m still on my journey, and it’s a solo journey for now. I’ve broken a few hearts and have had my heart broken as well. What I do know now, is that I’m not worried of being alone or dying alone. I now see that there are so many great single people out there, who are ready and willing to share their lives. All of the good ones are not yet taken. I know that when the time is right for me, I will be ready. Until then, I’m having fun learning about myself and about others and what’s important to me and what qualities I want in a partner and what qualities I want to improve in myself.

I fell in love with this guy because he had my name tatooed on his chest, but after I snapped the picture I never saw him again.

I fell in love with this guy because he had my name tatooed on his chest, but after I snapped the picture I never saw him again.

Why aren’t you blogging more? Can’t you make a lot of money on the blog to keep the travels going?

The truth is I really don’t like blogging, and I don’t think I would be good enough at it to make money. I know some travel bloggers, and I know they work their asses off. You need to be in constant contact with your fan base, and you are often critiqued for your travel choices, your opinions, your spending habits, and your grammar and spelling. I just don’t need or want the constant feedback on my life from strangers who are not walking in my shoes. I also don’t feel like I have a unique enough niche in the travel world to be successful. I’m not the foodie traveler or the fashion traveler or the adventure traveler or the budget traveler. I’m just doing me, and I don’t have the ego to think that people would pay to read about me, except my mom and my aunts who are my biggest online fans and supporters.

In the past few months I have been loving Instagram. I do believe a picture is worth a thousand words, so a picture with a couple hashtags must be worth at least three thousand. #iloveinstagram. I’ve been having an on-going, internal debate about my Instagram though, about whether I want it to be ‘private’ for only my friends and family to see or ‘public’ to share my amazing photographic skills with the world. I actually opened my Instagram for public viewing, and I was oddly saddened by it. Now my likes and comments were from strangers and people I never met. It was different than when I got a “like” on my cat photo from my friend Katie because we met through our shared love of cats or a “like” on my bug picture from Glenn because he was with me in Nicaragua when my bug obsession started. These “likes” mean something to me, and in a small way keep me connected to those I love. The “likes” from strangers were just hollow and meaningless. My account is back to private, but who knows. Maybe someday that will change.

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Are you going to write a book?

Maybe? I feel the same about writing a book as I do about writing a blog. Is there really something so special to write about? What’s the plot? What’s the lesson? What’s the ending? I could write a book that says something like “I went here and saw this and then I went there and saw that”. But that’s more just a journal, and I consider my Instagram my photo journal. I could write about my opinions on places I’ve been, but they are just that…my opinions, not facts. Does anyone really care what I think? I’ve read many travel books, and the ones that I loved have had some deeper purpose or some interesting challenge or some meaningful revelation at the end. If I have any of these, I will write a book, but I’ve read enough travel books to know that not all experiences are book-worthy. Granted, I still have more time. Maybe if I am kidnapped by North Korean dissidents and held captive for 76 days or if I meet a sexy billionaire who sweeps me off my feet and convinces me to sign a sex slave contract…then I’ll have a book idea worth sharing. But for now, I’m just having experiences and learning to enjoy the moments for myself instead of worrying about how to describe them in words for other people to read.

What do you do every day?

In my last blog posts, I described how I travel and what I do when I first arrive.  After that, I just try to live places. After seeing the major sites, I really like to settle into a city and just try to have a regular life. For me this includes reading (I’ve probably read more books in the past two years than I have in the past 20. If you like reading, hook up with me on Good Reads and let me know your favorite books), finding a yoga studio, meeting people, finding the best coffee shop and restaurants in town, and just walking around. Some days I quite literally do almost nothing. It took me some time to adjust from the hectic San Francisco lifestyle, where there were never enough hours in the day to do everything to a life of free time and relaxation. When I was in Nicaragua and I stopped going to Spanish school and first started doing nothing, I was so uncomfortable, I needed to make a list to make sure the hours of the days were full. My list included: walk on the beach, go to yoga, go to weekly poker game, do laundry, read a book, update blog (which was so rarely done I soon realized it wasn’t something I enjoyed).  At first, I felt bad about doing nothing.  I was “idle” and not contributing to the world. But eventually, I stopped worrying so much about doing “things” and contributing to the greater good, and started focusing on making myself a better person, through learning and reading and breathing and relaxing and yoga and eating healthier and drinking less beer and more green juices. I no longer consider these activities a waste of time or selfish endeavors. I think self-love and taking care of yourself are some of the most important things in life. Someday, I will go back to work, and when I do, I hope I keep with me some of my new-found lifestyle of relaxing and taking it easy and not stressing so much.

I love coffee.

I love coffee.

What do you miss most from your old life or the US?

My friends and family, of course, but today’s digitally connected world allows me to keep in contact from afar. I miss the endless food and restaurant options that were available in San Francisco.   I love Thai food, but right now I kill for some real Mexican or sushi. And when I leave Thailand, I’ll be craving Pad Thai like I was all last year in South America. I miss walking into a store like Target or Walgreens and being able to buy exactly what I want. Many of the skin care products across Asia have “whitening” agents in them to make your skin lighter. It’s so ironic because in the US, we like the tanned look, and have so many “self-tanning/darkening” lotions. I just want some regular SPF 30 sunscreen that’s not greasy and won’t whiten me, and it’s been impossible to find.

Do you miss working?

No. Even on my worst day of travel, there was not one moment that I thought, “I wish I was working right now”.

What will your next job be? Could you go back to your old business?

I wish I knew. I seriously doubt I could ever return to a regular 9 to 5 job in a cubicle, after 12 years of being my own boss, but who knows. I might be broke and desperate. I think a lot about what my “second career” will be, and I have some ideas, but nothing solid has materialized. I love animals so much, that I would like to have a career that has something to do with animals. I have also been enjoying yoga during my travels. I’ve done yoga on and off for over 15 years, but I really want to learn and understand more about it, so I am signed up to do a 200 hour yoga teacher training in Bali in April. I don’t know if I will ever actually become a yoga teacher, but I want to explore that. Also, through my travels I taken tons of tours, and I often find myself thinking, oh I could’ve given a better tour than that, so maybe a tour guide or speaker of some sort will be my next gig? Who knows? I have some time to figure it out, so I’m using this time to learn more about myself and what gets me excited. I bartended in Nicaragua, but quit in the middle of my second night, so that job is off the list. I chopped corn at the Elephant Nature Park in Thailand, and quickly realized it wasn’t for me, so farmer is also off the list. Although I don’t think I am particularly bad writer, I really don’t enjoy it, so blogger is out too.

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Laurie the Bartender

 

Laurie the Elephant Bather

Laurie the Elephant Bather

What have been your favorite countries so far?

Many people respond to this question by saying “Oh they are all so different. It’s so hard to decide.” Not me. But I do give the caveat that what countries I liked is completely influenced by where I went, how long I was there, how the weather was, who I met, what I did, if I got sick or tired, etc. So far my favorite countries have been Colombia, Nicaragua, Cuba, Cambodia, New Zealand and Nepal. Some runners up are Peru, South Korea, Thailand, and Italy.

Least favorites?

Switzerland, Laos and Belize. (Sorry Swiss friends, but full disclosure I was only in Zurich and only there for a day, so I do need to give it another chance. Why was everything so dang expensive?!)

What have you learned?

I have learned most how to be open to learning more, and to not let my prejudices and preconceived ideas about the world lead me. I’ve learned more about history and culture and people than I ever did in school or university. I’ve learned that I know very little and have so much more to learn.

How have you changed?

I am not sure about this one. I ask my friends and family if I am different because it’s hard to see changes in yourself. Like losing or gaining weight or going grey or getting wrinkles. You don’t just wake up one morning completely different. It’s a process over time. I had some friends say that I haven’t changed at all. I don’t know if that makes me feel more sad or relieved. I had one friend ask me why I wanted to change. Did I not like myself? I thought about it, and I do like who I am, but I do want to change. I want to be a better version of myself. Doesn’t everyone want that? My mom says that I am more patient. This is something that I am working on. I have learned to let things bother me less and less, and to accept the journey for what it is and to not rush. Everything will happen in the right time. Wow. Maybe I’m becoming a hippie/yoga/Buddhist. Maybe that’s not a bad thing…

Where are you going next?

I’m planning to visit Burma/Myanmar in the next month and then to Bali. After that, I’m wide open. At some point this summer I hope to return to New York to spend time with my mom and recharge the batteries. After that I’m thinking about Eastern Europe or maybe Africa? Or maybe back to Asia?   I have no idea, but I’m open to suggestions. I am estimating I have another year or so travel left in me, but who knows what the future will bring? I’m excited to find out myself!

If there are questions you have that I haven’t answered, please comment below and I will do my best to respond.

Cheers everyone!

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Categories: Recap, RTW, Solo Travel | 11 Comments

How Do You Do It? (Part 2 – What to Do When You Arrive)

The first few days in a new city or new country are the most exciting.  I’ve developed a pretty standard routine that works for me to get settled in.

  1. Walk Around. On my first day, I typically don’t plan any activities. I just walk around. I find a coffee shop or park, and I sit and watch. If I only have one or two days in a city, I will not do any museums or tours or anything but walk around. I do like to have a map in addition to the google maps app on my phone, so I can find my way home. Also, I make sure I have the address of the place I am staying.  If I know I am going to be staying in the town or city for awhile, I like to scope out the best coffee shops and grocery stores.

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    Walking around my first day in San Jose, Costa Rica

  2. Find the Highest Point in the City. I got this tip from another travel blogger, and I think it’s brilliant. Whether it’s a hike up a hill or an elevator ride up the tallest building, getting a birds-eye view of the city can help you to get your bearings and decide what else you want to see.

    Tallest building in the city:  Eureka Skydeck 88, Melbourne, Australia

    Tallest building in the city: Eureka Skydeck 88, Melbourne, Australia

  3. Find out the local food, drink, crafts, wildlife, activities, etc. I want to know what the national drink is. Is there a local delicacy? Do the locals really eat it or is it served for tourists? I was surprised to learn that most Peruvians do not eat alpaca (this meal is geared toward tourists), but they do frequently eat guinea pig (cuy).
    Ceviche, a Peruvian dish much tastier than cuy.

    Ceviche, a Peruvian dish much tastier than cuy.

    Are there animals here that I can’t see anywhere else in the world?  What silly souvenirs or unique crafts can be bought here?  Finally, I want to know if there is something I can do there that I cannot do anywhere else in the world or something I have never tried.  What makes this city unique?  Volcano boarding, visiting a jaguar rescue, seeing the world’s smallest orchid, walking through the largest gold museum in the world, or jumping off a bridge…let’s do it!

  4. Get a new cell phone SIM card. With my unlocked iPhone 4S, it has been easy and cheap (less than 10 bucks) to get a new SIM chip in every country. It is convenient and affordable to have a local phone number, for both keeping in touch with new local friends and for booking future travel.  At this time, I also like to find out and program into my phone the local 911 emergency phone number.

    For $5-$10 I can get a chip for my iPhone and a local phone number

    For $5-$10 I can get a chip for my iPhone and a local phone number

  5. Take a walking tour or a bus tour. Many people are dead set against organized tours, but I actually enjoy them. Especially with a walking tour you can get a taste of the best sites in the city, and make plans to go back to spend more time there later. I like to take a map on the tour and highlight the route, so I can find places again.  If I don’t want to do an organized guided tour, I will find a self-guided walking tour online.
    Self-guided walking tour of Lima, Peru

    Self-guided walking tour of Lima, Peru

    In a guided tour, I will try to get to the front of pack, so I can listen carefully and ask the guide questions. I almost always ask the guide where they eat.  I remember after a walking tour in Florence, Italy, I asked the tour guide where she ate, not where she recommends the tourists go.  She took me to an unmarked restaurant on a side street. It was one of the best meals of my trip. After my walking tour in La Paz, Bolivia, I offered to take my tour guide out to lunch, where I was able to ask all the things I wanted to know about Bolivia from the politics to dating to reality TV to relations with the U.S.. I made an instant friend who I’m still in touch with.   Also, specialty tours can be fun, too.  I took a chocolate walking tour in Zurich, Switzerland, a horse and buggy tour in Cartagena, Colombia and a boat tour in Granada, Nicaragua.

    Horse carriage tour in Cartagena, Colombia

    Horse carriage tour in Cartagena, Colombia

So that’s my first few day when I get to a new place.  Tell me what you like to do when you get to a new city below…

Categories: Planning, RTW, Solo Travel | 1 Comment

How Do You Do It? (Part 1 – Deciding Where to Go and How to Prepare)

People often ask me how I decide where I’m going next in my travels. It’s usually a combination of two things, one is suggestions from other travelers (and travel bloggers) and the other is cheap flights. I try to ask everyone I meet on the road what’s the best place they’ve visited. I have a list on my iPhone of recommended places and places I want to go, and it’s been growing fast. The second way I determine where to go next is looking for cheap flights. For example, I knew I wanted to head to Asia in September, and I have a huge list of places I want to go, including Thailand, Laos, Burma, and Japan, so I consulted my favorite flight search website Skyscanner. You can enter your departure airport and the destination as “everywhere”, and the site will give you a list or a map of destinations and costs. When I did this, I checked flights both from San Francisco and New York, and the best I could find in September was a direct, one-way flight to Seoul, South Korea from San Francisco for $422. South Korea. Not on my list and I knew very little about it, but I thought, hey, why not? So South Korea will be my first stop in Asia. Now what?

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Skyscanner App

How I Prepare:
If you are time-limited, I recommend planning the crap out of your trip ahead of time. Book ahead of time, so you aren’t wasting precious vacation minutes doing this. If you love this research and planning, it’s a great way to get psyched up before your trip. If you find it tedious (like me) you can find a travel agent to do it for you. I used an agent to plan out my 3 week whirlwind around Australia and New Zealand. The agent planned and booked every flight, hotel, transfer and even some activities. This made things so simple for me to just show up and go.

I don’t love the process, and I have the luxury of time, so advanced planning is not required for me.  If you have time, I recommend booking things as you go, so you have the flexibility to make on-the-fly decisions. There is some basic planning that I always like to do ahead of time, though…

  1. Research the safety issues of the country or city. For me, this is important to know before stepping foot in country. What’s the crime like? What are possible scams? Are there potential natural disasters like earthquakes, volcanoes, or hurricanes? Are there particular neighborhoods in cities that should be avoided? Recent terrorism, protests, strikes, political unrest? A quick internet search can get you this info, but I also try to talk to other travelers who have visited recently for real-time facts. After I get a feel for the situation, I file the information in the back of my mind and move on. I am not easily freaked out, I understand that there are risks everywhere, and I try to behave in a way to minimize the probability of something bad happening to me. I think that arriving completely ignorant is foolish, but obsessing over the potential things that could go wrong is paralyzing.
    Is this an active volcano?  Yes!  Ometepe, Nicaragua

    Is this an active volcano? Yes! Ometepe, Nicaragua

  2. Register with the U.S. Department of State and keep in touch. I am not trying to run off-the-grid or hide in a foreign country. Whenever I go, I let the U.S. government know where I’m going to be. In case something goes wrong, I want the government to know I’m there and to help me get out. I also let my family know where I am and where I’m going, usually via Facebook. If I know that I am going to be out-of-touch for a few days, I let my family know that as well.
  3. Find out about money. Before I arrive, I want to know what the currency used is, and what the approximate exchange rate is to U.S. dollars. Are credit cards accepted? Are U.S. dollars accepted? Are ATMs safe and available? Can I easily get or exchange money at the border or the airport?  I also research approximate costs for travelling there.  You can do a simple google search like “cost per day South Korea” to get some benchmarks for budgeting.  Be careful though, as you need benchmarks from like-minded travelers.  I’m not a ramen noodle-eating backpacker hoping to spend $20 per day, but I’m also not a luxury, 5-star resort kinda gal.  I have found some travel bloggers with similar travel styles, who can provide me guidance, so there’s no sticker shock when I arrive.
    How much is a Happy Meal in Guatemala?

    How much is a Happy Meal in Guatemala?

  4. Find out if you have any friends or friends of friends in the area. I like to put out on Facebook where I’m headed next to see if anyone lives or has lived there or visited, or knows someone to put me in touch with. Having a local contact has always been useful. There is also a Facebook app I like to use called “My Friend Map”, where you can see on a map the home towns of all of you Facebook friends. This was especially useful during my U.S.A. road trip.
    Sin título3

    What!? I only have one friend in Asia? I am going to fix that! (I’m also going to visit Courtney in Hong Kong for sure!)

  5. Book the first few nights. As a solo traveler, I am not comfortable just showing up to a city without a place to stay. I have done this, but it often gives me a bit of panic, worried that everything is booked and I’ll be sleeping on the street. My current favorite lodging for the first days in a new city is Airbnb. You are often staying with a local family, which is great to get an understanding of the culture first-hand and get great local tips. I find that Airbnb is better in big cities, so I did this in Lima, Peru, Bogota, Colombia and will be doing it in Seoul, South Korea. Hostels are good if you are more interested in meeting other travelers and hotels are great if you are more interested in having your own space.
  6. Read a book. I tend to avoid travel guides, as they are expensive and heavy, and I hate navigating them on my Kindle. What I do like is to find a book that takes place in the country where I’m going to visit. Reading a book about a place (either fiction or non-fiction) can give you a glimpse into the country. Some of my favorites: Havana Real: One Woman Fights to Tell the Truth About Cuba Today by Yoani Sanchez (Cuba), Gringo Nightmare: A Young American Framed for Murder in Nicaragua by Eric Volz (Nicaragua), Marching Powder: A True Story of Friendship, Cocaine, and South America’s Strangest Jail by Rusty Young (Bolivia), and Turn Right at Machu Picchu: Rediscovering the Lost City One Step at a Time by Mark Adams (Peru).
    I read about it, then discovered Machu Picchu, Peru myself.

    I read about it, then discovered Machu Picchu, Peru myself.

  7. Check the weather. I try to determine what kind of clothes and supplies I need before I arrive, but like the crime, I don’t dwell on this too much.
A baby sloth completely unrelated to this blog post (Costa Rica)

A baby sloth completely unrelated to this blog post (Costa Rica)

What do you think?  My ‘no planning’ actually involves some research.  How do you travel?  Leave me some comments and suggestions below.

And stay tuned for Part 2 of this post, where I tell you what I do when I get there…

Categories: Planning, RTW, Solo Travel | Tags: | 1 Comment

Packing for Long-Term Travel… My Original Bag Revisited

About a year ago I posted on my blog everything I would be taking with me on my trip.  (Click here to read the original post.)  Without knowing where I was going or how long I would be gone, I was clueless.  I poured over other online bloggers’ packing lists and “must haves” trying to be fully prepared, and at the same time keeping the bag weight to a mínimum.  As I look back over my old list, I laugh at some of the crap I brought.  I think the number one lesson I learned, is that yes, you can buy just about anything anywhere, but the quality is not the same.  Unavailable are the silky-soft-moisture-wicking-quick-drying Lululemon t-shirts, high-quality-wrinkle-defying face cream, or sturdy-leak-proof water bottles.  I just had to learn to live with lower quality stuff and adjust my spoiled nature or wait for friends to bring me things from the U.S.  So, here’s a review of what I originally packed and what I needed and what I didn’t (updates in bold).

Clothes

Footwear

  • Flip Flops (x2) – HavaianasI wore (and wore-out) both pair within 6 months.  I didn’t really need two though.  You can buy flip flops anywhere, but I do like the durability of the Havianas, so I bought a replacement pair in Nicaragua.
  • Flats (1) – TieksI did wear these quite a bit, as my “fancy/night out” shoes, but ha, let’s be honest, they really aren’t that fancy.  I ended up ditching them in Peru, and I don’t think I will buy another pair.
  • Sneakers (2) – A light walking pair and a heavier hiking/running pair.  I know.  Too many.:  I wore the walking shoes a bit, and the running sneakers almost never.  I ended up ditching both pair in Costa Rica and buying a pair of Merrell hiking shoes.  These have been awesome, and maybe my best purchase of the trip.
  • Socks (4):  For some reason, I never had enough socks.  Luckily these can be bought anywhere for cheap. 
  • Slipper/Socks (1):  I don’t know what happened to them, but in each place where I was spending more than a month (Colombia, Guatemala, Nicaragua), I bought cheap slippers for around the house.

Bottoms

  • Jeans (1) – Joes JeansI cannot say enough wonderful things about these jeans.  So durable and practical, and I used them everywhere.  I will maybe get a fresh pair before I head out again, but only one pair of jeans is needed.  Apparently,  you can wear jeans many times before washing.
  • Skirts (1):  I ditched this after Colombia.  I just didn’t wear it very much.
  • Long Yoga Pants (1) – Lululemon Studio PantThese pants are phenomenal and held up after many washings.  Perfect for yoga, work outs, plane and bus rides, pajamas, etc.
  • Cropped Yoga Pants (2) – Lululemon Step LivelyI really liked these as well.  I don’t think I used them as much as the other yoga pants, but still a great thing to have
  • Shorts (1) – Old Navy:  Used these a bunch and still have them.
  • Workout Shorts/PJ Bottoms (1):  I ditched these after Nicaragua, but I bought a couple of other cheap shorts to replace.
  • Dresses (2) – Peacock dress!:  I sent the peacock dress back to the States with my friend Nicole.  I just didn’t wear it enough, and it was too heavy.  The second dress I wore quite a bit, until it fell apart after too many washings.  I will probably buy that dress again.

Tops

  • Tank Tops/Sleeveless Shirts (5) – Also for working out, cause that’s gonna happen.:  Actually, working out DID happen occasionally.  I did Zumba in Colombia and yoga in Nicaragua. 
  • Short Sleeved Shirts (3):  I think I will get some more high quality t-shirts for the next leg of my trip, instead of constantly replacing with cheap, “disposable” shirts.
  • Long Sleeved Shirts (2):  Didn’t start using these until I got to Guatemala, but I was glad to have them then.  Also, in Peru and Bolivia.

Outerwear

  • Black Windbreaker Jacket (1) – LululemonExcellent, practical, lightweight jacket.
  • Black Light Jacket (1):  I used this hoodie quite a bit too.
  • Rain Poncho (1) – It’s raining in Cartegena!:  Never used it and ditched it in Colombia.
  • Bathing Suits (2):  I used these a bunch and eventually bought two new ones in Colombia and Nicaragua.  I think 2 is a good number for bathing suits, although at one point in Nicaragua I had 4.

Innerwear

  • Thongs (14):  Wore these and had my friend Sabeena bring me some new ones from the states when she came to visit.
  • Boy Shorts (6):  Wore these a bunch too.
  • Regular Bras (3):  The most difficult thing to find for me in South/Central America were high-quality, well-fitting bras.  Almost impossible.
  • Sports Bras (2):  Used these often.

Accessories

  • Sunglasses (2) – Ray Bans and Maui JimsReplaced the beat up Ray Bans in Lima, Peru, but overall I was glad to have these.  At times I bought fun, cheap, disposable shades along the way.
  • Sarong/Scarf (1) – Thanks Iris!:  I actually took two scarves and used both of them all the time.  When I was in Guatemala, I bought a few more cheap ones, but ended up ditching them because they were falling apart.
  • Buff “Hat” – Thanks Ruby!:  I used this more than I thought I would, and I will continue to bring it on my travels.
  • Jewelry – a couple pairs of hoop earrings, a few necklaces, nothing expensive or valuable:  I used these, and I also bought more cheap stuff along the way.
  • Watch (1) – Swatch: Love my swatch, but the strap holder thing broke, so I will probably get a new one.
  • Hiking hat (1) – Patagonia Never used this, so I ditched it, but I did buy some cheap, fun hats along the way.

Medicines

  • Acetaminophen PM:  Used it up and had my friend Nicole bring me a replacement.
  • Excedrine Migraine:  Barely used it.
  • Prescription Levothyrox:  Used it daily, and was able to buy more as needed.
  • Anti-Diarrheal:  Used rarely.
  • Sinus Decongestant:  Used never.
  • Benadryl:  Used never.
  • Fluconazole:  Used it up, will replace.
  • Cipro – Antibiotic:  Used it up, once for myself, but mostly gave away to other fellow travelers.
  • Doxycycline – Anti-Malaria:  Never used, will not replace.
  • Anti-Itch Cream:  USED!  For terrible mosquito bites.  Will bring again.
  • Antibiotic Ointment:  Used for occasional cuts and scrapes, will bring again.
  • First Aid Kit:  Mostly only used Band-Aids. 

Safety-Security-MacGyver Stuff-Comforts-Fun

  • Headlamp:  Used occasionally, will bring again.
  • Doorstop:  Used rarely, but glad to have it when I did.  Will bring again.
  • Travel Cable & Lock:  Never used the cable, so will probably ditch it, but the luggage locks were critical.
  • Duct Tape:  I don’t think I ever used this, but I might keep it with me just in case.
  • Super Glue:  I used it once, and it dried up, so I chucked it.  Won’t replace.
  • Pepper Spray:  Thankfully I never had to use this, but glad to have it.  I have a love-hate with this pepper spray, and I could (and might) write an entire blog post on how much trouble and anxiety this has caused me.  But either way, I think I am going to keep it.
  • Small Sewing KitThis was taken away from me at an airport in Guatemala, but I have since replaced it.
  • Swiss Army Knife:  The mini scissors on this were used all the time.  I will take this again.
  • Dreamsack – I’ve never used this, and not really sure if I ever will?:  I used and loved this thing!  And I will bring again.
  • Ear Plugs:  Used a bunch, and will bring again.
  • Eye Pillow – My favorite “luxury” item, so good for jet lag-induced headaches.:  Used daily, will bring again.
  • Cable Ties:  Never used and ditched in Guatemala.
  • Water BottleUsed until it broke and couldn’t find a decent replacement anywhere.  I will take again.
  • Carabiners – This is apparently a “must have”, but I have no idea when I will use these.:  Used once to clip my sleeping bag on my backpack.  Gave one away to a friend.  Not sure I need this.
  • Corkscrew:  Used it a bunch.
  • Umbrella (Small):  Used it rarely, but glad to have it when I needed it.
  • Antibacterial Wipes:  Used rarely, will not replace.
  • Quick dry towel:  Used rarely so I ditched it, but ended up buying a cheap towel in Peru.  Not sure if I will replace.
  • Plastic Ziplock Bags:  Used these for everything.
  • Thank You Cards:  Used rarely, will probably ditch em.
  • Pens & Sharpie:  Used the pens, but never the sharpie.
  • Traveling Translator Guide with Pictures to Point At – Thanks Sabeena!:  Didn’t use this once, but I think will come in handy for Asia.
  • Journal Books – Thanks Karen!:  Used these to record expenses mostly, but now I have an app for that, so I might not bring more.
  • Moo Cards – to give out my contact info when I make friends on the road:  I used these a bunch.
  • Dive Card/Dive Book – hoping to get more use from this:  Only used it once in Colombia!  But I will continue to bring it.
  • Exercise Band – Ha!  I’m so sure I’ll use this daily.:  Never used this and ditched it in Guatemala.
  • Playing Cards:  I never used them, ditched them in Guatemala, and then bought a deck in Nicaragua.  I will bring these again.

Toiletries

  • Sunscreen:  Good sunscreen is impossible to find and is very expensive in South/Central America.  Will bring again.
  • Tissues:  Used daily.  Available everywhere for cheap.
  • Bug Spray:  Used frequently.   Found that it is better to buy this where you are, as the formulas can be different for the region.  I bought some great repellent in Colombia, that was made for the awful mosquitos they have there.
  • Toothbrush:  Used daily.  But when I needed to replace it I couldn’t find “soft” head. 
  • Toothpaste:  Used daily.  Cheap and available everywhere.
  • Soap:  Used daily.  Cheap and available everywhere.
  • Eyes Cream:  Used daily.  Cried when I ran out and had friends bring me from the US. 
  • Face Cream:  Used daily.  Could not find any decent to replace.
  • Face Wash:  Used daily.  Found decent replacements when needed.
  • Pocket Mirror:  Used daily.  Half of it broke, so I will replace.
  • Dental Floss:  Used rarely.  Sorry Mr. Dentist.  I just never think about it.
  • Shampoo:  Used daily.  Found decent replacements when needed.
  • Conditioner:  Used daily. Found decent replacements when needed.
  • Deep Conditioner:  Used weekly.  Could not find good replacements.
  • Dry shampoo:  Never used and ditched.
  • Headbands:  Used daily to hold my hair when washing my face.  That’s it really.
  • Hair Ties:  Used frequently until I got a terrible haircut in Peru and my hair was too short.  😦
  • Hair Clip:  Used daily until they broke.  Will bring again.
  • Comb:  Used daily.
  • Brush:  Used daily.
  • Chap Stick (x2):  Used daily.
  • Tweezers:  Used frequently until they were confiscated getting on a flight in Guatemala.  Impossible to find a decent replacement.
  • Nail Clippers:  Used frequently.
  • Nail File:  Used rarely.
  • Razor:  Used frequently.
  • Deodorant:  Used daily.
  • Mascara:  Used daily.
  • Eyelash Curler:  Used daily.
  • Eye Shadow:  Used daily until it broke and made a mess everywhere.
  • Face Powder:  Used daily.
  • Eye Liner:  Used occasionally.

Electronics

  • Kindle & Charger:  Used daily.
  • iPhone 4S & Charger:  Used daily.
  • Halo Pocket Power – Back-Up Charger for iPhone – Thanks Linda!:  Used often.  A lifesaver.
  • ASUS Laptop & Charger – I mentally debated taking this, but ultimately decided that I want it.:  Used occasionally until it broke in Colombia, and I bought a replacement laptop.  Ultimately I am glad to have this.
  • International Converter:  Never used it, because everywhere I went had US outlets, but I will bring this again.
  • Grid-It Organizer – This thing is pretty cool.:  Never used it and ditched it in Colombia.

Important Stuff

  • Passport with Kate Spade Cover – Thanks Lisa!:  Used frequently.
  • Health Insurance Card – Blue Shield says they’ll cover me on the road!:  Never used it and ditched it after the rates doubled.
  • Real Wallet & Dummy Wallet – One to give to theives?  I have read a lot about this “dummy wallet”, but I don’t know anyone who actually had to use this tactic.  I just plan on not carrying much with me.:  Never used the dummy wallet.
  • 500 US Dollars:  Spent it.
  • 600,000 Colombian Pesos:  Spent it.
  • Chase Sapphire Visa Credit Card – Primary credit card with no international fees:  Used frequently.
  • Edward Jones Master Card – Back-up credit card:  Never used it.
  • Charles Schwab Debit Card – Primary ATM card with no fees:  Used frequently.
  • Edward Jones Debit Card – Back-up ATM card.  Never used it.
  • Bank of America Debit Card – Back-up to the back-up ATM – I really don’t want to keep this account open, but it has my business account on it and all of my automatic bill pay, so…  Never used it.
  • Old Student ID – For student discounts?  I am not sure if I can still pass as a student?:  Never used it.  Will ditch it.

Bags

  • Primary Suitcase – Eagle Creek Twist 65L – a rolling bag/backpack hybrid.:  This bag was excellent, but I only once used the backpack straps, and I hated them.  I’m not going to ever use them again, if I can help it.  I *might* try to downsize to a smaller bag, but I am still researching.
  • Carry-On Bag – Timbuk2I ditched this in Guatemala and replaced with an excellent, small North Face backpack that I can use for weekend trips, hiking, and as a carry-on.
  • Purse – Baggallini Amsterdam Crossbody:  I ditched this, but not sure when.  I just buy a small, cheap local purse wherever I am. 

I am still trying to downsize even more.  Clothes and toiletries take up the majority of space and weight in my bag.  With clothes, it is a constant balance of having less clothes, vanity/boredom with these few clothes, how “dirty” clothes need to be to warrant washing, and how often I get laundry done.  For toiletries, I grapple with expensive, tiny bottles of products versus larger (heavier) bottles, that cost less and last longer.  I’m not sure if I will ever get the balance perfect, but I am going to keep trying.  Any questions or comments, write them in below….

Categories: Packing, Recap, RTW | 2 Comments

1 Year of Travel: A Look Back (Part 4 – The People)

In my first year of travel, the very best thing has been the people that I have met up with along the way.  The friends and family I visited on my road trip gave me a chance to take another look at my past and remember where I have been.  I met up with old elementary school, high school, and college friends, old co-workers and people I had met on previous travels.  And family too!  I was able to spend time with family members that my old day-to-day life didn’t give me the time to do.  I am so grateful for this.

Friends I visited in the US

Friends I visited in the US

More Friends!

More Friends!

Family!

Family!

I want to give a shout out to my four friends who have come to visit me after I left the US.  Jessica, Nicole, Craig and Sabeena, your visits meant more to me than you could ever know.  You all remind me that no matter how I travel or where I go, I will always have my friends and family only a flight away.  Love you guys.

My Visitors!

My Visitors!

And finally, my new friends.  I knew I would meet people along the way, but I had no idea how many bonds I would form in a short period of time.  I have met people in this last year that I know I will be in touch with for the rest of my life.  Some people I lived with for months, and others I met only once that have touched my life, opened my eyes, and changed my world.  For this I am truly grateful.

New Friends!

New Friends!

More New Friends!

More New Friends!

Ok, so that is my “people” recap.  If I have left anyone out, I apologize.  I realize that I forgot to take pics with some very important people I spent time with like Kristen in Boston, Toby in Connecticut and Nicole in Guatemala, but I remember and think about all of you.  I promise to continue to meet new friends and try my best to keep up with everyone.

And for the next year of my travels?  Who knows?  I am in Nicaragua for awhile, and I plan on getting back to New York for a visit sometime this summer.  The plan is to be in Asia by the fall.  I can’t wait to see where year 2 takes me.   Sending love and hugs to everyone!

Categories: Friends and Family, Recap, RTW, Year 1 | 8 Comments

1 Year of Travel: A Look Back (Part 2 – The Adventures)

When I started this trip, I decided that I wanted to try as much as possible, to challenge myself to move beyond my usual comfort zone and to accept challenges that came my way, physical, emotional and mental. Everything I tried opened my eyes a bit more and made me stronger from the inside out. Some of my favorite adventures of the last year…

The Road Trip – I spend over two full months driving alone through the US. This was an adventure in and of itself, testing my driving skills (which are awesome, by the way, with zero tickets and zero accidents), my ability to deal with boredom and my imagination to pass the time. The road trip taught me patience and an appreciation for listening to books on tape.

My view for thousands of miles driving through middle America & the teddy bear mascot I picked up in Yellowstone

My view for thousands of miles driving through middle America & the teddy bear mascot I picked up in Yellowstone

I started without a map thinking my phone and GPS would be enough.  Thankfully my friends in Utah gave me this one, and it became my daily bible.

I started without a map thinking my phone and GPS would be enough. Thankfully my friends in Utah gave me this one, and it became my daily bible.

Hiking Alone – I understand that this might not seem like an “adventure” to many people, but for me it was scary and liberating.  For much of my travel, I found myself alone, but still wanting to go on hikes.  Would it be safe?  What if I fell?  Had a heart attack?  Got lost?  Finally, I just sucked it up and went for it.  And I found that being alone with nature can be incredibly freeing.

Hiking alone in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Hiking alone in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Scuba Diving – I was certified a few years ago, and regrettably I have not used my certification as much as I could.  In Colombia, I was able to go diving, and for the first time ever, at a sunken ship.  The crew didn’t tell us about it, so when I looked up and saw the ship, I was so awed.

Scuba Diving in Colombia

Scuba Diving in Colombia

Horseback Riding Up A Live Volcano – A few weeks after I went on this adventure, the volcano started erupting and they had to cancel the tours temporarily.

Horseback Riding Up Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala

Horseback Riding Up Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala

Boarding Down a Live Volcano – This one was probably the craziest, but this is the only place in the world where you can board down a live volcano.

Volcano Boarding, Cerro Negro, Leon, Nicaragua

Volcano Boarding, Cerro Negro, Leon, Nicaragua

ATM Cave Tour – Sadly, I have no photos to show with this adventure, but this might be the coolest thing I have done.  The Actun Tunichil Muknal (ATM) cave tour (outside San Ignacio, Belize), leads you on a hike with three river crossing to get to the cave entrance.  Once there, you have to wade, swim, scramble over rocks, sneak in between rocks to end about two miles inside to an ancient Mayan burial site.  My description does not do this adventure justice, so you can read more about it here.  I highly recommend this tour to anyone who wants a challenge and fun!

I plan on continuing the adventures and saying “yes!” to all the crazy opportunities I’m given…..

Continued….1 Year of Travel:  A Look Back (Part 3 – The Animals)

Categories: Adventure, Colombia, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Recap, RTW, USA, Year 1 | 1 Comment

1 Year of Travel: A Look Back (Part 1 – The Beauty)

May 1, 2014 marks the one year anniversary of me quitting my job and driving away from San Francisco, my home of 17 years. I left behind my friends, my cats, my business, and everything I knew in life. I had no idea what lay ahead of me, but I knew I had to do this. In the last year, I drove over 12,000 miles (alone), visited 32 US states, 9 countries and took 12 flights. This trip has been everything I had hoped for and more. I am grateful everyday that I am able to live my dream, and I don’t have a single regret. A now for a look back at my favorite scenes…

This planet we live on is amazing. Beauty is everywhere you look, if you open your eyes. I don’t own a camera because I try to live in the moment wherever I am, and I find having a camera distracts me from this. Sometimes I wish I had more than my iPhone 4S to capture the loveliness in front of me, and to be able to share this with others, but I think the iPhone does a good enough job for me. Below are some of the most wonderful things I’ve seen.

Old Faithful Geyser, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Old Faithful Geyser, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

The Badlands National Park, South Dakota

The Badlands National Park, South Dakota

Chicago, Illinois

Chicago, Illinois

Niagara Falls, Canada

Niagara Falls, Canada

Cartagena, Colombia

Cartagena, Colombia

Parque Nacional Tayrona, Colombia

Parque Nacional Tayrona, Colombia

Guatapé, Colombia

Guatapé, Colombia

2013-12-06 11.39.30

La Antigua, Guatemala

El Tunco, El Salvador

El Tunco, El Salvador

Tikal National Park, Guatemala

Tikal National Park, Guatemala

Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve, Costa Rica

Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve, Costa Rica

Bocas del Toro, Panama

Bocas del Toro, Panama

Little Corn Island, Nicaragua

Little Corn Island, Nicaragua

Isla de Ometepe, Nicaragua

Isla de Ometepe, Nicaragua

 Continued…1 Year of Travel:  A Look Back (Part 2 – The Adventures)

Categories: Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Panama, Recap, RTW, Solo Travel, USA, Year 1 | 2 Comments

Solo Travel: The Good and The Bad

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I’ve been traveling for over eight months now. Eight months and eleven days to be exact. When people ask me how it’s been, I immediately say that I’ve loved every minute of it. But to be honest, this is not exactly true. Solo travel for me has (overall) been wonderful, but it’s far from perfect.

The Good:
1. The best thing about traveling alone is being able to do whatever I want and whenever I want. I never have to deal with the conversation: “What do you want to do today?” “I don’t know what do you want to do today?” Or “I’d love to visit the museum of firearms.” Or “Another beach day, Laurie? Aren’t you tired of beaches?” (Um, no). It is completely freeing and liberating to wake up and do exactly what I want to do. Or to do exactly nothing.
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2. The second best thing about traveling alone is the ease of meeting other people. When I traveled with my ex-boyfriend we rarely met other people. Occasionally we’d meet another couple, but mostly we were each other’s company. Traveling alone forces you to talk to strangers or at least a bartender. I personally think bars are great. My parents owned a bar when I was young, so I always say that I grew up in a bar. I’m comfortable on a bar stool, even if I’m alone. In fact I’m writing this from a bar stool at my hotel in Rio Dulce, Guatemala. My theory on bars is that people go there to socialize, if not they could just drink from home. If there’s an option, I’d rather eat at a bar than at a table for one. Best case scenario, you meet someone interesting and end up talking all night and they buy your dinner (which happened surprisingly often when I traveled in the US). Worst case scenario, the bar is dead, but you have a beer and write a blog and go home early.

3. For me, the third best thing about traveling alone is just like you aren’t counting on anyone else for your fun and enjoyment, no one is counting on you. You have no pressure to find the best hotel/tour/beach and you don’t have to worry about disappointing someone. I don’t like the pressure/responsibility of having control over someone else’s happiness…(hmm, maybe this is why I’m single…. ) When I’m traveling alone if the tour is a bust or the hotel has bedbugs, it was my decision and I never have to deal with someone else’s complaining/unhappiness/unmet expectations. And the biggest change I’ve found in myself over the last eight months is the lowering of my expectations and the increase in my patience. I told a new student (and now a friend) at my Spanish school in Colombia to be prepared for disappointment. I’ve found often in my travels (especially in South/Central America) that things don’t often never go as planned. Buses are late, people are flaky, plans are canceled last minute, etc. For example, I’m currently in this small Guatemalan coastal village waiting to get on a sailboat for a week-long sailing trip to Belize that will never happen because it was canceled because not enough people signed up. So I’m going to try to head somewhere else tomorrow. Instead of my usual crushing disappointment, I just shrugged, and I’m moving on. I would feel awful if I convinced a friend or a travel partner to come on the sailing trip, and they were disappointed.
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The Bad:
1. The worst thing about traveling alone, is yes, at times it is lonely. The bar is empty (or worse, full of couples holding hands), they are playing sad Adele through the speakers, and the bartender doesn’t even want to say hello. This happens. You had a great day and saw something amazing like a volcano or a sunset or a guy on the street playing violin with his feet and you have no one to discuss it with. Actually I like Facebook for being able to share my experiences when I don’t have someone to talk to.
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2. Making decisions and planning can be hard and exhausting. Yes, I get to make every decision and do what I like, but sadly I have to make every decision. I’m often oscillating between over-researching and reading every Trip Advisor/Lonely Planet review for every hotel in an area to not even knowing where the bus I’m on is going. I actually prefer the latter. But mostly when I’m on a bus not knowing where I’m going, someone else has done the leg work and I’m just tagging along on their research and advice. I can get paralyzed with the research and the decision making side of travel. It would be great to have a travel partner who loved to handle the details. Or maybe a travel agent that knew what I liked to do and just planned everything for me. I was actually on Trip Advisor today wishing there was a function to sort by things I like (ex. Quiet, close to restaurants/bars, safe, mid price range. etc. Or better yet, eliminate places that have things I don’t like, like crazy backpackers or kids yelling in the pool.). Like a personalized trip advisor. Business/ap idea anyone? Or anyone like doing research want to be my personalized travel agent, I could use a good two week itinerary in Costa Rica starting on January 20.

3. On the practical side of solo travel, things are just more expensive when you are a party of one. All hotels and car rentals would be half price if I had someone to share with. In many restaurants the entrees are often too big for one person. I would love to be able to “split an appetizer and an entree” every night instead of ordering just an appetizer or worse, ordering an entree and wasting half.

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So that’s my take on solo travel. It’s not always rainbows and butterflies, but it’s a journey and I’m growing and changing everyday with the experiences I’m having and the people I’m meeting. I met a fascinating women named Elizabeth in a bar a few weeks ago. She has been traveling the world alone for the last two years since the death of her husband. And she’s 90 years old. She amazed and inspired me with her courage and her strength and her stories of China and India and Mexico. She made me feel young again, although I’ll be celebrating a big milestone birthday this year. When I start to question whether I can navigate this world alone I think about Elizabeth and I realize that my life is not even half way done, and it’s never too late to travel alone.
What do you think? Do you love traveling alone? Prefer with a partner? Let me know in the comments below. Adios!

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Categories: RTW, Solo Travel | 10 Comments

Packing for the RTW

Deciding what to pack for my “Round the World” has been stressful fun.  I have researched this topic to death, and I have read pages and pages of packing lists on what I will want and need.  The common theme I heave heard time and again, “Take half of what you think you need” and “Pack light!”.  As a former safety consultant, I think that I need to be “prepared for anything”.  The reality is that I am not going to be away from civilization for long periods of time, and I can buy just about anything anywhere I go.  What I am struggling with most is that I already have many things, so I want to bring them instead of buying them on the road as I need them.  For example, I am starting in a hot climate in South America, but eventually I’ll be in cooler climates.  So do I bring my awesome down puffer coat and Merrell boots now?  Or just buy them again later?  Or have them shipped to me later when I need them?  These are the questions keeping me up at night.

So, here it is, everything I am bringing (including things crossed out that I thought of bringing and then decided against).  Too much?  Not enough?  Let me know what you think in the comments below.

Clothes

Footwear

  • Flip Flops (x2) – Havaianas2013-08-21 11.03.01
  • Flats (1) – Tieks
  • Sneakers (2) – A light walking pair and a heavier hiking/running pair.  I know.  Too many.
  • Boots (1) – Merrell’s
  • Socks (4)
  • Slipper/Socks (1)

Bottoms

Tops

  • Tank Tops/Sleeveless Shirts (5) – Also for working out, cause that’s gonna happen.
  • Short Sleeved Shirts (3)
  • Long Sleeved Shirts (2)

Outerwear

  • Black Windbreaker Jacket (1) – Lululemon
  • Black Light Jacket (1)
  • Puffer Coat
  • Rain Poncho (1) – It’s raining in Cartegena!
  • Zip Up Sweater
  • Bathing Suits (2)

Innerwear

  • Thongs (14)
  • Boy Shorts (6)
  • Regular Bras (3)
  • Sports Bras (2)

Accessories

  • Sunglasses (2) – Ray Bans and Maui Jims
  • Sarong/Scarf (1) – Thanks Iris!
  • Buff “Hat” – Thanks Ruby!
  • Jewelry – a couple pairs of hoop earrings, a few necklaces, nothing expensive or valuable
  • Watch (1) – Swatch
  • Wooly hat
  • Gloves
  • Baseball cap
  • Hiking hat (1) – Patagonia

Medicines

  • Acetaminophen PM 2013-08-21 11.50.16fakit
  • Excedrine Migraine
  • Prescription Levothyrox
  • Anti-Diarrheal
  • Sinus Decongestant
  • Benadryl
  • Fluconazole
  • Vitamins
  • Cipro – Antibiotic
  • Doxycycline – Anti-Malaria
  • Anti-Itch Cream
  • Antibiotic Ointment
  • First Aid Kit

Safety-Security-MacGyver Stuff-Comforts-Fun

  • Headlamp2013-08-21 18.30.49
  • Doorstop
  • Travel Cable & Lock
  • Duct Tape
  • Super Glue
  • Pepper Spray
  • Spot GPS?
  • Small Sewing Kit
  • Swiss Army Knife
  • Dreamsack – I’ve never used this, and not really sure if I ever will?
  • Ear Plugs
  • Eye Pillow – My favorite “luxury” item, so good for jet lag-induced headaches.
  • Cable Ties
  • Water Bottle
  • Carabiners – This is apparently a “must have”, but I have no idea when I will use these.
  • Sink stopper – If I really need to do laundry in a sink, I’ll use a sock as a plug.
  • Utensils
  • Flask – I don’t drink hard alcohol.
  • Corkscrew – I do drink wine!
  • Umbrella (Small)
  • Antibacterial Wipes
  • Quick dry towel – will use sarong if needed
  • Plastic Ziplock Bags
  • Thank You Cards
  • Pens & Sharpie
  • Traveling Translator Guide with Pictures to Point At – Thanks Sabeena!
  • Journal Books – Thanks Karen!
  • Moo Cards – to give out my contact info when I make friends on the road
  • Dive Card/Dive Book – hoping to get more use from this
  • Exercise Band – Ha!  I’m so sure I’ll use this daily.
  • Playing Cards

Toiletries – I know I have over packed here, but hey, I’m a girl

  • Sunscreen2013-08-22 23.24.43
  • Tissues
  • Bug Spray
  • Toothbrush
  • Toothpaste
  • Soap
  • Eyes Cream
  • Face Cream
  • Face Wash
  • Pocket Mirror
  • Dental Floss
  • Shampoo
  • Conditioner
  • Deep Conditioner
  • Dry shampoo
  • Headbands
  • Hair Ties
  • Hair Clip
  • Comb
  • Brush
  • Chap Stick (x2)
  • Q-Tips
  • Tweezers
  • Nail Clippers
  • Nail File
  • Razor
  • Deodorant
  • BB Cream
  • Mascara
  • Eyelash Curler
  • Eye Shadow
  • Face Powder
  • Eye Liner

Electronics

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  • Kindle & Charger
  • iPhone 4S & Charger
  • Halo Pocket Power – Back-Up Charger for iPhone – Thanks Linda!
  • iPad & Charger – Gave to my sister Julie
  • Small Alarm Clock – I’ll just use my iPhone
  • Sony CyberShot Camera & Charger – I might not take this.  I have been using my iPhone exclusively for photos for over a year, and not sure I need to have another device
  • ASUS Laptop & Charger – I mentally debated taking this, but ultimately decided that I want it.
  • International Converter
  • Grid-It Organizer – This thing is pretty cool.

Important Stuff

  • Passport with Kate Spade Cover – Thanks Lisa!
  • Health Insurance Card – Blue Shield says they’ll cover me on the road!
  • Real Wallet & Dummy Wallet – One to give to theives?  I have read a lot about this “dummy wallet”, but I don’t know anyone who actually had to use this tactic.  I just plan on not carrying much with me.
  • 500 US Dollars
  • 600,000 Colombian Pesos
  • Chase Sapphire Visa Credit Card – Primary credit card with no international fees
  • Edward Jones Master Card – Back-up credit card
  • Charles Schwab Debit Card – Primary ATM card with no fees
  • Edward Jones Debit Card – Back-up ATM card
  • Bank of America Debit Card – Back-up to the back-up ATM – I really don’t want to keep this account open, but it has my business account on it and all of my automatic bill pay, so…
  • Old Student ID – For student discounts?  I am not sure if I can still pass as a student?

Bags

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Ok, that’s about it.  Comment/criticize/judge me below.  Also, if you want to get an email when I post a blog, click the “+ Follow” in the lower corner of this page.

Categories: Packing, RTW | 11 Comments

It’s the Final Countdown!

The international portion of my “round the world” journey begins in less than a week, and I am so excited that I might explode!  I am headed to Cartegena, Colombia on August 25, 2013.  I am currently registered for six weeks of Spanish language classes at Centro Catalina Spanish language school.  Centro Catalina has set me up to live with a local Colombian family, so I can completely immerse myself in the language and the culture.  After I become fluent, I will continue traveling through Central and South America.  I have no set plans after the first six weeks in Cartegena, so I guess I will sort that out when the time comes.  Any suggestions are welcome!

It’s been almost four months since I left San Francisco on this adventure.  I can say that time moves slower when you aren’t working and you don’t have a set schedule of things to do or a ton of friends around.  I did my fair share of sitting by the pool this summer.  Luckily, I do feel like I accomplished a few things staying in the U.S. for the first four months of my RTW.  Below is a list of when I have done:

1.  Spent quality time with my friends and family, especially my wonderful mom.

2013-07-08 21.02.02 2013-08-12 15.23.14-1 2013-06-28 21.27.29-2 2013-06-20 16.49.04 2013-06-27 14.57.45 2013-06-26 21.00.47-2 2013-06-14 10.16.05 2013-05-04 21.22.46 2013-07-11 12.12.03 2013-06-14 17.17.31

2013-06-17 19.49.49

2013-05-27 10.38.53-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.  Checked “Visit All 50 States” off my bucket list.

3.  Read eight novels, including The Language of Flowers, The Cuckoo’s Calling, and Defending Jacob.

4.  Completed the Duolingo Spanish language iPhone app.

5.  Gained 10 lbs. driving around the country noshing on health food choices like Memphis BBQ and Chicago Pizza.

2013-07-01 12.10.332013-05-16 15.32.44 2013-06-21 22.03.23 2013-06-30 19.05.47

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.  Lost the 10 lbs. with a crazy diet called “Eat Less/Better and Exercise More”.  I also give credit to Evolution Fitness bootcamp with Jenny, Just Fitness Classes, the documentary “Fat, Sick & Nearly Dead”, Gracie’s Gear Virtual Training, my friend Lauren Gendler‘s “SugarFree3” plan, and a juicer.

7.  Got used to not having many “things” and even harder still, not buying more things.

8.  Mentally prepared for a life of full time travel.

So, in the next week I am trying to finish up last minute details, planning, packing.  One detail for friends and family, I will be shutting off my cell phone and I will lose the 444 phone number.  I am planning on getting a SIM card for my iPhone and a local phone number in Colombia, but until that happens, email or Facebook will be the best way to contact me.

Hasta la vista baby!

Categories: Friends and Family, RTW, USA | 12 Comments

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